Forum Summaries

Truth and Post-Truth
Summary by Claire Hsiang Marx, Meridian 180

In February 2017, Meridian 180 held a forum to explore the political implications of an environment in which multiple truths exist. Forum leader Professor Zhao Shunkun, professor at Southwest University of Law and Political Science in Chongqing, China, asked a series of stimulating questions focused on the intersections of authority, media, and the public, and the different roles and questions each stakeholder should be considering. The forum engaged a wide range of experts including legal scholars, journalists, economists, political scientists, and policymakers and resulted in a lively exploration of the role of technology, media, and power in a post-truth era. (read more)

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Global Data Governance

Summary by Claire Hsiang Marx

In December 2016, Meridian 180 held a forum on Global Data Governance, led by Fleur Johns, Professor of Law at University of New South Wales, Australia, and Sung-in Jun, Professor of Economics at Hongik University. Prompted in part by recent scandals in the United States surrounding the hacking and release of email data, Johns and Jun urged Meridian 180 members to think widely about the issues and implications of how to govern data, as well as how data governs individuals and systems. The forum generated a wide exchange of ideas from a diverse group of economists, sociologists, computer scientists, anthropologists, and legal experts from Australia, China, Korea, the U.S. and Latin America. This summary provides a brief overview of insights provided by contributors. (Read more)

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The Changing Politics of Central Banking
Summary by Annelise Riles (Cornell Law School) and Jonathan Miller (Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, Cornell University)

In the 2016 forum, Riles encouraged members to revisit these questions as part of a larger investigation: “how to understand the place of the state in the market and, in particular, the place of the central bank in relationship to politics in all the senses of the term.” She asked participants to present what they considered the most compelling intellectual questions and political issues surrounding central banks. (read more)

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