Forum Summaries:

Meridian 180 publishes summaries of the central themes and ideas discussed in our online forums. Forum summaries are drafted by students and interns (and occasionally by Meridian members).

The Trans-Pacific Partnership
Summary by Kyle Reinert

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the most ambitious project to expand and enable trade in our time, holds both major promise and poses major difficulties. Prompted by negotiations made in Lima, Peru regarding the changing terms, avenues, and possibilities of the TPP, our members identified and reflected on important questions that circulated regarding trade law and dialogue. (read more)

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Terms of Trade: The Utility of Language Ambiguity
Summary by Eudes Lopes

Language ambiguity provides for interpretation, opinion, and meaning, but sometimes makes adherence difficult. Members discussed the uses, benefits, and consequences of language ambiguity in a transnational political context, focusing on the World Trade Organization. (read more)

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Privacy 2.0
Summary by Elise DeVido

By turning our attention to transnational negotiations of privacy and its underlying values, we can contribute to an area not yet widely addressed by contemporary research. In this forum, members applied their opinions on the issue of contemporary privacy rights and policies to the trans-pacific dialogue. (read more)

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Some Thoughts on Privacy and Privacy Rights
Summary by Elise DeVido

Increase in availability and exchange of information through the Internet has posed many to wonder whether regulations on privacy should tighten. This discussion attempted to answer this through the definition of privacy, the degree of government intervention into privacy, and the appropriate parameter of privacy rights. (read more)

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Central Banks in Question(s)
Summary by Elise DeVido

With a rapidly globalizing world, each country’s economic fluctuation has become every other country’s concern. This forum focused on central banks and their role in the highly volatile macroeconomic climate. Many participants agreed that central banks must evolve in order to adapt to the changing market. (read more)

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